Cases


Heart of Atlanta Motel v. United States

Heart of Atlanta Motel v. United States

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Heart of Atlanta Motel v. United States

 

The Background of Heart of Atlanta Motel v. United States:

Heart of Atlanta Motel v. United States was a landmark United States Supreme Court decision, which stated that the United States Congress could use the Constitution’s Commerce Clause to fight acts of discrimination.

Heart of Atlanta Motel v. United States represented a distinct challenge to the Civil Rights Act of 1964; for the majority of the century prior to the Civil Rights Movement, race relations in the United States had been dominated by a system of segregation known as “separate but equal.” This social structure ultimately perpetuated racial tensions for African Americans were predominantly offered inferior accommodations. If you need legal advice and assistance, contact Atlanta lawyers.

Atlanta Motel v. United States Trial:

When passed on July 2, 1963, the Civil Rights Act of 1964, banned all forms of racial discrimination that was present in public places. This ban, which was placed on particularly public accommodations, was primarily based on Congress’ control of interstate commerce.

The Heart of Atlanta motel was a large hotel in Atlanta, Georgia, which refused to rent rooms to African Americans. The owner of the hotel filed a suit in federal court, arguing that the requirements of the Civil Rights Act violated his Fifth Amendment right to choose customers and operate his business as he wanted resulted in unjust deprivation of his property without due process of law and just compensation.

In response to this claim, the United States countered that Congress, under the United States Constitution’s Commerce Clause, was certainly within its power to address such provisions. In addition, the decision of Heart of Atlanta Motel v. United States stated that the Fifth Amendment does not forbid regulations of interstate commerce and incidental damage did not constitute the “taking” of property without due process of law or just compensation.

Heart of Atlanta Motel v. United States ruled that Congress acted within its jurisdiction of the Interstate Commerce clause in passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964, thereby upholding the act’s Title II in question.

The Case Profile of Heart of Atlanta Motel v. United States

The following is a case profile of the legal trial eponymously titled ‘Heart of Atlanta Motel v. United States’:

Date of the Trial: Heart of Atlanta Motel v. United States was first argued on October 5, 1964

Legal Classification: Administrative Law; this legal field associated with events and circumstances in which the Federal Government of the United States engages its citizens, including the administration of government programs, the creation of agencies, and the establishment of a legal, regulatory federal standard

United States Reports Case Number: 379 U.S. 214

Date of the Delivery of the Verdict: Heart of Atlanta Motel v. United States was decided on December 14, 1964

Legal Venue of Heart of Atlanta Motel v. United States: The Supreme Court of the United States

Judicial Officer Responsible for Ruling: Chief Justice Earl Warren

Verdict Delivered: Congress did not exceed its powers under the Commerce Clause by enacting Title II of the Civil Rights Act of 1964—which prohibited racial discrimination in public settings, particularly areas of public accommodations.

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