Home Court Cases

Court Cases

A Quick Explanation of Federal Cases

A Quick Explanation of Federal Cases

In
the United States, an individual who has committed a Federal offense will be
tried in a Federal court. Federal cases generally involve specified crimes,
including cybercrimes, intrastate kidnapping, counterfeiting, and embezzlement.
The location at which an offense occurred and the people involved the crime may
also give the Federal court jurisdiction over a case. 

 

Federal cases are tried in United States
district courts. It is in district courts that the initial phase of a Federal
case will occur. An offender will be convicted and sentenced in this court.
Following the issuance of a verdict from a district court, a defendant may file
a request for an appeal with a U.S. appellate court. 

 

If he/she wishes to appeal the appellate
court’s decision, he/she must petition the U.S. Supreme Court. The U.S. Supreme
Court is the highest court in the country and maintains very limited
jurisdiction. It oversees cases involving diplomats and the Federal Government.
It may also have jurisdiction over cases involving significant sums of money or
damages of more than $75,000.


North Carolina Police Abuse Cases

North Carolina Police Abuse Cases

Many police abuse cases have surfaced in recent years. A well-known North Carolina police abuse case pertained to a prison inmate named Bill Rayburn. Rayburn claimed that he was attacked on four separate occasions in a brutal manner with pepper spray. Rayburn, on all four occasions, had called for assistance and was then attacked with the spray. Rayburn won a $10,000 injury settlement and was transferred to a new prison.

Other North Carolina police abuse cases involve an overly forceful crowd control situation in which police officers tasered individuals without reason. Another North Carolina police abuse case involved a young man from Greensboro, North Carolina. The individual was horribly beaten and kicked numerous times while he was being arrested. Videos of the arrest show that the individual was not resisting arrest and did not initiate the fight with the officer, nor did he fight back.

Often, police abuse cases go without being uncovered or discussed because of the fear the law enforcement holds over other individuals. Police abuse can include verbal abuse, sexual assaults, threats, physical abuse, and blackmail.  

Cases will include more information about other well-known police abuse cases.