Jarecki v. G.D. Searle & Co.

Jarecki v. G.D. Searle & Co.

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Jarecki v. G.D. Searle & Co.

 


Jarecki v. G.D. Searle & Co.: The Background

 

The case of Jarecki v. G.D. Searle & Co. was a landmark matter heard before the United States Supreme Court. The case of Jarecki v. G.D. Searle & Co. was heard before the United States Supreme Court on March 21st and 22nd of 1961 and decided on June 12th of the same year.

In Jarecki v. G.D. Searle & Co., Jarecki was a former college of internal revenue and the G.D. Searle & company was granted certiorari to the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit in the United States.

 

Jarecki v. G.D. Searle & Co.: Supreme Court Ruling

 

The case of Jarecki v. G.D. Searle & Co. held that income resulting from the sale and manufacturing of certain patented camera, camera equipment, stereo products and drugs resulting from inventions is not included within the state or statutory definition of “abnormal income.” The definition was utilized to illuminate this sort of incomes eligibility for special tax exemptions including the Korean War Excess Profits Tax relief under the Excess Profits Tax Act of 1950.

 

The case of Jarecki v. G.D. Searle & Co. is an example of the maxim noscitur a sociis which is a proverb of sorts meaning a “word is known by the company it keeps.” The case of Jarecki v. G.D. Searle & Co. therefore noted that the maxim is typically applied where a word is capable of several meanings. This application is viewed in many meaning because it avoids giving unintended authority to acts of Congress.

 

The case of Jarecki v. G.D. Searle & Co. was heard before Chief Justice Earl Warren and the following Associate Justices: Hugo Black; Potter Stewart; Charles Whitaker; William Brennan Jr.; John Harlan; Tom Clar; William Douglas; and Felix Frankfurter.

 

Jarecki v. G.D. Searle & Co.: The Developments

 

The case of Jarecki v. G.D. Searle & Co., stated that the development of new products is not deemed “discovery” within the meaning of the Internal Revenue Code of 1939. Moreover, income resulting from the sale and manufacture of certain cameras, camera equipment, stereo products and drugs is not included in within the definition of “abnormal income”

 

This form of income; however, is made eligible for Korean War excess profits tax relief because the classification of income of all classes not described in the act are subject to regulations prescribed by the secretary.

 

The case of Jarecki v. G.D. Searle & Co., presents an overall problem in the interpretations of the Internal Revenue Code of 1939 as well as a section of the Excess Profits Tax Act of 1950. The general dispute of Jarecki v. G.D. Searle & Co., asked whether income from the sales of certain new products qualifies under the statutory definition of “abnormal income.”

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